rarestandpurestformofgenerosity

witsradio:

paulftompkins:

Next week, two of my worlds collide when The Thrilling Adventure Hour podcast crosses over with MPR’s WITS radio show.

WITS is a delightful program hosted by the most splendid John Moe, and upon which I have guested many many many times. You can catch it on the honest-to-God radio, or you can catch up with it via podcast here.

Beyond Belief is a segment of the live, staged fake-radio show The Thrilling Adventure Hour. Each segment of TAH is podcast individually. The Beyond Belief segment— starring myself and Paget Brewster as Frank and Sadie Doyle— concerns a pair of boozy paranormal investigators who are married to each other and to booze. It’s The Thin Man with ghosts. And more booze.

Booze.

Frank & Sadie Doyle, along with musical guests Rhett Miller and "Weird Al" Yankovic, will be visiting WITS on Friday, October 24th.

If you want to catch up on the adventures of Frank & Sadie Doyle. here are all of their adventures for your listening pleasure. They’re all about 20 minutes or so, with the occasional super-sized special episode along the way. I personally recommend all of them.

Beyond Belief Episode Guide

Beyond Belief poster: Tom Fowler

We are so flippin’ excited!!

An excellent introduction to two of my favourite things: Wits, and the Thrilling Adventure Hour!

rahzzah:

Beyond Belief by Rahzzah
Who cares what evil lurks in the hearts of men?
http://www.nerdist.com/podcast_channel/thrilling-adventure-hour-channel/

A gorgeous poster of Frank and Sadie, from the unmissable Thrilling Adventure Hour’s segment, Beyond Belief.

rahzzah:

Beyond Belief by Rahzzah

Who cares what evil lurks in the hearts of men?


http://www.nerdist.com/podcast_channel/thrilling-adventure-hour-channel/

A gorgeous poster of Frank and Sadie, from the unmissable Thrilling Adventure Hour’s segment, Beyond Belief.

Eloquent words from Paul Elie on Mary Stewart. May she rest in peace and rise in glory. 

etr-gu:

image

Certain authors leave us feeling not admiration or devotion so much as gratitude – gratitude for the time we spent, the peak experiences we had, with the books they wrote.

For me, Mary Stewart was such an author. She died yesterday in Scotland, where she lived, age 97. But the memory of

mcnallykids:

EB White on the power and importance of libraries, 1971.

This is wisdom.

mcnallykids:

EB White on the power and importance of libraries, 1971.

This is wisdom.

hodgman:

I had a good time talking on CBC radio just now, and I am looking forward to going to WINNIPEG tomorrow to talk on stage with Bill Richardson and share in your weird Manitoban rituals! 
PLEASE JOIN US 
Pictured above, THE POOL OF THE BLACK STAR. Look it up, non-Winipeggers. 

Perhaps the coolest room I’ve ever been in!

hodgman:

I had a good time talking on CBC radio just now, and I am looking forward to going to WINNIPEG tomorrow to talk on stage with Bill Richardson and share in your weird Manitoban rituals! 

PLEASE JOIN US 

Pictured above, THE POOL OF THE BLACK STAR. 

Look it up, non-Winipeggers. 

Perhaps the coolest room I’ve ever been in!

popsugartech:

LEGO Settlers of Catan is too epic for words.

A project!
I've seen your comments on twitter and Facebook and feel like I am more anonymous on those sites than here. Sir, Twilight is made fun of because it glorifies very bad things. It takes horrible things like stalking, self harm and suicide, abusive tendencies, wanting to murder someone, and a loss of self identity in place of your significant other's identity and makes them seem beautiful and romantic. I beg you to read the books, because there is a lot of very bad stuff in them.

fishingboatproceeds:

I hope I can be clear about this, but my thoughts all day have been a bit muddled, so I apologize if I express myself poorly or come off as defensive or anything.

1. There are deeply problematic relationship dynamics glorified in Twilight.

2. Criticizing misogyny in art is good and important. 

3. My concern is that popular work by women receives far more vitriolic criticism from the public (like, in terms of number of demeaning jokes made by Jay Leno*) than popular work created by men.

4. So I think we’re talking about two different kinds of criticism: The totally legitimate criticism we see in literary journals and feminist web sites about misogyny, and the demeaning and dismissive this-sucks-because-teen-girls-like-it-and-everyone-knows-that-teen-girls-are-not-fully-human criticism we see in popular culture.

5. Also, I would like to see equal attention given to the sexism in popular work by men, from Nicholas Sparks to for instance J. D. Salinger. Catcher in the Rye—although I like it very much—is profoundly and disturbingly misogynistic and yet seems to get a critical pass both online and off. This happens a lot, I think, with books by men, and I don’t want male writers (including me!) to get that pass.

6. I might be wrong about any/all of this. I’m wrong a lot, and always trying to learn.

*EDIT: Apparently Jay Leno has retired. You learn something new every day.

The impulse behind the original twitter comments—well-stated here, and what I’d characterize as a wise condemnation of what one might call ‘contempt prior to investigation’—was spot on. The lack of nuance available on twitter is well addressed here. I find the idealization of the Bella/Edward relationship deeply worrisome, and many of the tropes of the first book (the only one I’ve read) are intensely problematic in the roles they reinforce.
I would love to see us as a culture refrain from turning what’s popular into a punch line, without actually engaging,

To be absorbed…

johndarnielle:

mana-junkie:

Sign of Truth.

this has basically been my philosophy since I was 12

Truth.

johndarnielle:

mana-junkie:

Sign of Truth.

this has basically been my philosophy since I was 12

Truth.